Ryanair Engines

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RyanairBristol
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Ryanair Engines

Post by RyanairBristol » 20 Apr 2017, 13:14

Hi, I was just wondering if anybody knew what specific model engine does Ryanair use on the 737-800?

I am aware that they are using the CFM56-7B engine however there are two variants. There is the CFM56-7B24 and the CFM56-7B26. The 24 has a higher bypass ratio, meaning it is more efficient, but less thrust. While the 26 has a higher thrust rating and a lower bypass ratio.

Does anyone know if Ryanair use the 24 or the 26 model? I personally imagine they use the 24.

Thanks.


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Re: Ryanair Engines

Post by Ryanairmadrid » 27 Apr 2017, 13:09

What about in their new MAX aircraft?

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Re: Ryanair Engines

Post by RyanairBristol » 27 Apr 2017, 15:09

That would be the CFM International LEAP 1B

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Re: Ryanair Engines

Post by Ryanairmadrid » 04 May 2017, 13:35

I guess the newer 737 would have the CFM56-7B26 engine as opposed to the other one.
There is also the
CFM56-7B27 engine.
Maybe the 7B has different variants of engines. From 7B24->7B27 ??

Is there an expert in the forum??

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Re: Ryanair Engines

Post by RyanairBristol » 07 May 2017, 10:36

I believe the CFM7B series runs from the 18 to the 27. The 27 is used on the 737-700, 737-900 and the BBJ.
The main difference between the 24 and the 26 is the thrust and bypass ratio ( The amount of air that enters the engine but does not go through the core)

CFM56-7B24
Thrust
24,200 lbf (108 kN)
Bypass ratio
5.3
Compression ratio
32.7.
Dry weight
5,216 lb (2,370 kg)

Engine
CFM56-7B26
Thrust
26,300 lbf (117 kN)
Bypass ratio
5.1
Compression ratio
32.7
Dry weight
5,216 lb (2,370 kg)

Modern day jet engines are called high bypass turbofans meaning that the majority of its thrust comes from the air that has not been burnt but simply routed around the inside of the engine. The main function of the combustion in the engine is to drive the front fans in order to suck the air into the engine to bypass it. This causes lower thrust than the pure jet engine but allows the best efficiency at the cruising speeds of modern aircraft.

The 24 has a higher bypass ratio but because of this less thrust is available. This however, as far as I'm aware but might be wrong, means that fuel economy is higher because in normal flight you are achieving the same amount of thrust but with less air being combusted.

The advantage of the 26 is that the higher thrust rating allows the aircraft to operate at smaller runways.

However, if you compare this to the CFM Leap you can see the jump in bypass ratio and thus greater fuel economy. The CFM Leap 1B has a bypass ratio of 9. And the CFM Leap 1A, used on the A320 neo of 11. This was caused to Boeing 737 MAX having a lower ground clearance and the engine had to be smaller. This meant Boeing had to focus on other methods of fuel consumption reduction.


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